Archive for the ‘Events’ Category

Career Development Workshop & ATC 6: Neuropsychology, Neurophysiology & Rehabilitation

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2016-05-08 16.57.04

4-6th May 2016
Trinity College Dublin

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by Edwin Dalmaijer

The INDIREA network met in Dublin in May 2016, to share knowledge on cutting-edge techniques in brain monitoring and stimulation. Researchers from Trinity College Dublin presented their most important and recent findings, and highlighted some of the possibilities that electroencephalography (EEG) provides through advanced statistical modelling and related techniques.
The final talk in this series was an honest and somewhat sobering investigation of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) that focussed on the extent to which these techniques can actually affect neuronal activity. The next day, all PhD students in the network gave 10-minute talks on their most interesting findings to date.

In addition to the scientific content, a full day of career training was organised for the PhD students in the network. The absolute highlight was an interactive session on grant writing, provided by INDIREA PI Masud Husain from the University of Oxford, during which he gave writing tips and shared some of his insider-knowledge on how committees assign funding to grant applications.

As per usual, the meeting also gave us the opportunity to informally discuss work (and personal life), and many new studies were conceived over drinks in a local pub. Fortunately, at least some of those turned out to still be great ideas the next morning.

Mid-Term Review Meeting & ATC 5 : Neurocomputational Modelling

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Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona
15 – 18th September 2015

Mid-Term Review Meeting Agenda:

ATC 5 Agenda:

Bootcamp 5 gave the ESRs experience on multiple levels of neurocomputational modelling. It covered basic principles of modelling as well as specific worked examples applied to whole-system behaviour, fMRI, EEG, and single neuron responses.

ATC 5 was combined with the Mid-Term Review meeting, which assessed the fulfilment of all aspects (scientific, research training, management, etc) described in Annex 1 of the Grant Agreement.

More information [internal access]

 

ATC 4 : Introduction to EEG

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munich group

11 – 13th March 2015
Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich

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by Katharina Glomb

March 12 and 13 of this year saw the 4th Advanced Training Course of the INDIREA Marie Curie initial training network taking place at the Dept. of Experimental Psychology of the LMU in the heart of Munich. The goal of this meeting was to provide an introduction to EEG and ERP methodology which are relevant for any neuroscientist, and will also be applied by some of the students of the project. There were great introductory lectures with hands-on tutorials showing the use of BrainVision Analyzer, the commercial software developed by one of the partners of the ITN, namely Brain Products. Drs Tracy Warbrick and Filipa Viola did a great job at showing us many different features of this complex piece of software and made sure that even the students that will not analyze EEG data now have an idea of the benefits and pitfalls of this technique.

We were lucky enough to attend two excellent talks by University of Oxford’s Nick Myers and LMU’s own Paul Sauseng, and we heard a lot about what role synchronization might play in attention in the brain.
One of the highlights was the ESR’s poster session. It was a refreshing atmosphere in which it became clear that after about a year, everyone has made quite some progress and has much more of an idea of how their PhD projects will be shaped. It was also a great opportunity to present our posters to several of the attending PIs and to each other. Even during the dinner on the night of the first day, conversations about our projects and science in general dominated the table until quite late while actual horses were (drawing their training laps?) in the riding school to which the restaurant is attached.

Many thanks to the organizers of this meeting – I think we all learned a lot and enjoyed ourselves, too!

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ATC 3 – Introduction to MRI

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magdeburg square

24-26th September
Otto Von Guericke University Magdeburg

Host: Jochen Braun

Agenda:

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by Adriana Ruiz

In September 22014 the INDIREA network held its third meeting in Magdeburg. The aim of this meeting was to learn about magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its applications on cognitive and clinical neuroscience research, and more specifically in the field of attention.

The agenda for this workshop was very exciting and full of innovative approaches. Claus Tempelmann, from Magdeburg, began the boot camp by explaining the basic principles and general applications of magnetic resonance imaging. Afterwards, as a guest speaker from Bilkent University, Tolga Cukur presented an innovative approach to analyze functional MRI (fMRI) data, which is centered on the voxel and uses semantic categories to explain how the brain responds to visual attention. The afternoon session was opened by Tobias Donner from the University of Amsterdam, who spoke about exciting results related with perceptual judgments when the sensory input is constant. The two final talks of the day were given by Michael Hoffman and Ariel Schönfeld – both from Magdeburg – who addressed the topics of plasticity of human visual perception and the spatio-temporal correlates of visual attention, respectively. The day concluded with a guided city tour and dinner at the Fürstenwall restaurant.

The second day of the workshop included three excellent talks and one ‘hands-on’ session on fMRI. Gustavo Deco, from Barcelona, introduced the topic of functional and structural connectome as a way of combining MRI and computational neuroscience approaches. Next, Jens-Max Hopf from Magdeburg gave a presentation on the neural mechanisms of global feature-based attention, including research findings using magnetoencephalography, electroencephalography, and fMRI. Then, Glyn Humphreys spoke about relevant insights into the use of functional brain imaging in patients. Lastly, during the afternoon session all PhD students had a practical session on fMRI data acquisition and analysis, led by Alexander Pastukhov, while PIs and student representatives held a management meeting.

We had a nice experience in Magdeburg and a very profitable boot camp. Thanks Eli Fulcini, and Jochen Braun and his team for this lovely meeting!

Additional information [internal access]

ATC 2: TVA and psychophysical testing

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copnehagen over bridge

10th & 11th June 2014
Copenhagen University

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by Bart Cooreman, Rachel King & Chiron Oderkerk

In June the INDIREA network met in Copenhagen for their second international Bootcamp. The aim of the meeting was to learn about the Theory of Visual Attention (TVA) and how it can be applied. There was a mix of lectures and discussions which covered everything from the mathematical principles, to applied patient work.

Claus Bundesen kicked off the meeting with an introduction to the theoretical framework of TVA, and its neural interpretation (NTVA). Søren Kyllingsbæk focused on the various paradigms and its methodological issues, while Anders Petersen covered the methods for fitting individuals’ TVA-parameters from appropriate data. This last talk was followed by a workshop which allowed students the opportunity take part in a TVA experiment and to apply Matlab-based TVA-models.

On the second day, the focus shifted to the use of TVA in more applied research: Thomas Habekost laid out studies of patients with lesions. Iris Wiegand, in turn, talked about current attempts to find neurophysiological biomarkers of TVA. Signe Vangkilde discussed current attempts to improve neuropharmacological approaches. Finally, Claus Bundesen allowed for questions and discussions regarding the specifics of TVA.

Following the Bootcamp there was a TVA conference which illuminated both the scope for application and the future direction of TVA modelling. The trip also provided opportunities for members of INDIREA to network during a series of dinners and explorations of the city. The staff and students from the university were very welcoming, knowledgeable, and delivered a good balance between academic content, discussion, and cultural exchange. Overall the Bootcamp proved both enjoyable and valuable for the attending INDIREA students.

Additional information [internal access]

ESR Orientation Meeting & ATC1: Attention – from neurons to cognition and the lab to bedside

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UKSBM2

12 & 13th May 2014
Department of Experimental Psychology
University of Oxford

Agenda: 

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by Alexander Luettich

In May, the first INDIREA Bootcamp took place at the University of Oxford. This meeting brought together all 13 Early Stage Researchers (ESRs) and Principal Investigators (PIs) for the first time.

The two-day meeting kicked off with a welcome from the INDIREA Network Co-ordinator, Glyn Humpreys, followed by short presentation from INDREA partner Universities.

In the afternoon Adam Gazzaley, a guest speaker from the University of California, gave a lecture on the Future of Neurotherapeutics, where he presented his latest development of a gaming-based cognitive function enhancement treatment.  Following the lecture Oxford researchers, Masud Husain, Kia Nobre, Christopher Summerfield and Gaia Scerif delivered speeches on important aspects of their work. This covered mnemonic, temporal, developmental and decision related aspects of attention.  The day concluded with a dinner at St Hugh’s college.

On the second day, INDIREA associate partners from the British Stroke Association and P1vital, a private clinical research organisation, gave a general introduction to their field of work and INDIREA students and supervisors were able to discuss potential future collaborations. Magdalena Chechlacz and Dante Mantini then gave a presentation on lesion symptom mapping and demonstrated this using the procedures adopted at the University of Oxford. The Bootcamp finished with two final talks, the first from Nele Demeyere, which covered the current clinical tests for attentional functions, which was followed by Signe Vangkilde and Anders Petersen discussing mathematical modelling of attention.

Additional information [internal access]